2024 Legislative Session Bill Summaries

These are summaries of bills that are moving through the legislative process. Because there are a large number of education bills introduced each legislative session, we only provide summaries of bills that have a passed a committee in the House or Senate. 

If you have further questions on any of these bills or any that have been introduced, please contact IASB Lobbyist Emily Piper or IASB Government Relations Director Michelle Johnson.

Confirmation of McKenzie Snow: McKenzie Snow has been confirmed to her position as Director of the Department of Education. Senate confirmations require approval by two-thirds of senators, and her appointment was confirmed by a vote of 34-15. IASB does not take a position on gubernatorial appointments.  

HF 255—Teacher Intern Program & Alternative Licensure: This bill establishes the requirements for attaining a teacher intern license and a license through an alternative program.    

To obtain a teacher intern license, candidates must:    

  • Have a bachelor’s degree that meets the requirements of an endorsement area  

  • Have an offer of employment from a school district 

  • Complete pedagogy training 

  • Work under the supervision of a teacher leader    

To obtain a license from an alternative program, the requirements are:    

  • Have a bachelor’s degree 

  • Complete an alternative teacher certification program    

The alternative program can be online and must include pedagogy training. An amendment would require 60 hours in the classroom, 30 of which must teaching under the supervision of a licensed teacher, prior to licensure. The remaining hours can be completed by serving as a paraeducator or in another classroom role. It would also require the program to include preparation in the Science of Reading, if that also becomes a requirement for licensure through traditional teacher prep programs.  

IASB is registered opposed to this bill, but the amendment will change our registration to undecided. We are supportive of a more robust teacher intern program, but we still have concerns about an alternative licensure that does not have any limitations on grade level or endorsement area. We like the addition of required time in the classroom before receiving a license through an alternative program. The bill passed the Senate Education Committee as amended.   

HF 2152/SF 2364—Teacher Leadership and Compensation (TLC) Commission Reports: This bill is a code clean-up bill because of legislation passed last session. It removes the requirement for a report on the TLC program that was removed in last year’s ESA bill, which gave added flexibility to the TLC program.  

IASB is registered undecided on the bill, but we have no concerns with making conforming code changes. The bill passed the House by a vote of 95-0 and the Senate by a vote of 48-0. It now goes to Governor Reynolds for her signature.  

HF 2278—Open Enrollment Transportation: This bill allows a receiving district of an open enrolled student to send school vehicles into the district of residence to pick up students. This is limited to districts with an enrollment of less than 2,000 students, vehicles can’t go more than two miles into the district of residence and the student must live closer to their school in the receiving district than the school they would attend in their district of residence. If the school board in both the sending and receiving districts agree to it, transportation can be provided by the receiving district in any circumstance. The Senate amended the bill to clarify that sending districts are not responsible for the cost of transportation for low-income students if they take advantage of transportation outlined in this bill. 

IASB is registered undecided on the bill because it doesn’t require approval by the board in both districts, but there are good limitations on it. The bill passed the Senate, as amended, by a vote of 49-0 and has been sent back to the House for their concurrence on the amendment. 

HF 2299—Open Records Requests: The bill allows a school district to provide public records requested through an open records request in any reasonable format, not just the format requested. If a public record is available on the district’s website, they do not have to provide an alternate copy to fulfill an open records request.   

IASB is registered for the bill as it offers simplicity when fulfilling open records requests. The bill passed the House by a vote of 91-6 and passed the Senate State Government Committee. Most recently, the bill was placed on the unfinished business calendar

HF 2393—Dental Screenings: This bill adds dental screenings, in addition to vision and hearing, as allowed in schools without receiving parental consent. An amendment on the House floor specifically added the word 'screening' to clarify the intent.   

IASB is registered for the bill, as this is an important service schools provide students. The bill, as amended, passed the House by a vote of 95-0 and passed the Senate 48-0. It has been sent to Governor Reynolds for her signature. 

HF 2398/SF 2121—Bond and Insurance Policies for Board Members: The bill allows a public officer to purchase an insurance policy in lieu of posting a bond and requires the policy to substantially meet the bond requirements. It allows for the reasonable expenses of the insurance policy to be paid for by the government to the extent the expenses of the bond would be covered.  

IASB is registered in support of the bill because it reflects the current practice of districts. The bill passed the House by a vote of 97-0 and the Senate by a vote of 46-0. It will now be sent to Governor Reynolds for her signature. 

HF 2465—Agriculture Classes as Science Credit: This bill would allow agriculture classes to count toward the five required units of science, with a limit of two units of agriculture that can count toward the science requirements. It also adds additional math course options related to applied sciences, technology, engineering or manufacturing.   

IASB is registered in support of the bill because it allows more flexibility for students to fulfill science requirements but puts good limits on it. The bill passed the House by a vote of 95-0 and passed the Senate by a vote of 48-0. It has been sent to Governor Reynolds for her signature.  

HF 2487—Reporting Grooming Behavior to BOEE: This bill includes several policies related to BOEE procedures: 

  • Moves the process established for investigating complaints against school employees under the authority of the BOEE. This process was established in legislation (HF 430) last year, but under the authority of the Department of Education.     

  • Adds mandatory reporting of grooming behavior to the BOEE and will result in a teacher’s license being revoked. 

  • Adds definitions of grooming behavior, inappropriate relationships, and misconduct.  

  • BOEE will report any evidence of a crime to law enforcement that they find during an investigation of a licensed or non licensed school employee. 

  • Removes the statute of limitations to file a complaint against a school employee for engaging in an inappropriate relationship. 

IASB is registered undecided on the bill. We like the addition of a definition of grooming; however, we have concerns about removing the statute of limitations because it could put districts in a difficult position of defending a claim from years prior without sufficient witnesses or evidence. The bill passed the Senate by a vote of 49-0 and passed the House by a vote of 89-0. It will now be sent to Governor Reynolds for her signature. 

HF 2516/SF 2411—Work-Based Learning Programs: This bill proposed by the governor allows for work-based learning to be provided when school isn’t in session, including over the summer. A division to change student teaching requirements will allow between 1-10 weeks of experience as a paraeducator or substitute teacher to count toward the required 14 weeks of student teaching experience. The student must be in a classroom at the grade level in which they are earning an endorsement and must be responsible for planning and instruction in the classroom.  

IASB is registered for the bill. We support work-based learning programs and the change in student teaching requirements for those with prior work experience. The bill passed the Senate by a vote of 33-13. 

HF 2539—Open Meetings Violations Fines: The bill increases the fines for violating open meetings laws, from not more than $500 to not more than $5,000. It also requires training for newly elected school board members on open meetings and open records laws. A Senate committee amended the bill to remove mandatory training be provided by the Iowa Public Information Board (IPIB). 

IASB is registered opposed to the bill. We agree there should be fines for violations, but these fines are very steep for unpaid school board members. Additionally, we think we provide adequate training and resources to board members on open meetings laws. The bill passed the House by a vote of 92-2 and passed the Senate State Government Committee, as amended.  

HF 2541—Vacant School Building Demolition Grant Fund: This bill would provide a grant fund to help districts tear down vacant buildings. They will only be granted in towns of less than 2,500 residents and in a county that is one of the lowest 88 counties in population. Districts will not be required to sell the property after demolition, but if they do sell, the proceeds, after accounting for the costs of demolition, will be put in the grant fund. There is no appropriation for the grant fund included in the bill.  

IASB is registered undecided on the bill, but generally supportive of this grant fund, as it allows districts to tear down old and unused buildings. The bill passed the House Economic Development and Technology Committee. It has been referred to the House Appropriations Committee.  

HF 2542/SF 2367—Statewide Data System and Enrollment Count Dates: The bill establishes that the Department of Education (DE) will acquire a data system to be used by all school districts for collecting information and filing required reports. The cost will be covered by the DE in the first year and may be covered by a fee assessed to districts in subsequent years. The fee cannot be more than $12 per pupil for the first year, but there is no cap after that. Additionally, the bill adds a second count date, March 1. The average of enrollment on October 1 and March 1 will be used.  

IASB is registered against the bill. We have concerns about districts being required to implement a new data system and what the ongoing cost will be. Two count dates provide a more accurate enrollment, but the March 1 date is very close to budget deadlines, and we have concerns the certified enrollment will not be available soon enough. The bills passed the House and Senate Education Committees, respectively and both were placed on the unfinished business calendar.  

HF 2543—Open Enrollment Funding and Charter Schools: This bill, proposed by the governor, has four divisions.  

Division I says that certain categorical funds will follow open-enrolled students to the receiving district and charter school students to their new school.   

Division II allows for a first right of refusal for charter schools for vacant or underutilized property being sold by a school district. This means the district must give a charter school the first opportunity to purchase it. School districts would be required to publish information on their website about their buildings' size and usage. It also establishes definitions of “underutilized” and “vacant” properties.  

Division III allows the school start date to be the first Tuesday after the end of the Iowa State Fair. This section was removed with an amendment.  

Division IV removes the requirement that charter school board members be residents of Iowa.  

IASB is registered undecided but has concerns about categorical funds following students because the per pupil amounts of these funds vary across districts, which creates winners and losers. We don’t like Division II and would prefer fair competition when a district decides to sell or lease their property. The bill passed the House Education Committee as amended and was added to the unfinished business calendar.  

HF 2545—Graduation Requirements, Standards and Curriculum Review: The bill requires a comprehensive review of high school graduation requirements, core curriculum and educational standards. An amendment was added to ensure public comment and input on each graduation requirement, core content standard, and educational requirement.   

IASB is registered undecided on the bill. We support a review of our standards to ensure we’re providing the best education to our students but want to ensure all stakeholders are meaningfully involved in the review. The bill passed the House, as amended, by a vote of 61-34. It also passed the Senate Education Committee. 

HF 2553—Nonpublic School Student Extracurricular Participation: This bill requires public schools to allow nonpublic school students to participate immediately in extracurricular activities if they live within the school district. If nonpublic school students do participate, they won’t be included in the count that determines a district’s classification. For nonpublic school students to participate at a public school, their school can’t offer the activity.   

IASB is registered undecided on the bill, but we do appreciate more clarity on this issue. The bill passed the House by a vote of 56-39. It also passed the Senate Education Committee. 

HF 2586—School Security Grant Program and Arming School Staff: The bill requires school districts with a total enrollment over 8,000 students to employ private security or a school resource officer (SRO) at each 9-12 attendance center. Districts below an enrollment of 8,000 are simply encouraged to employ school security. School boards can vote not to employ school security.
Additionally, school employees can be issued a permit to carry weapons if they complete a comprehensive firearm safety training course, legal training, emergency medical training and communication training provided by the Department of Public Safety (DPS). DPS will be required to implement annual live scenario training and quarterly live firearm training for school employees that have opted in to carrying a firearm. The bill provides qualified immunity for the employee and the school district from liability for damages due to using reasonable force. It’s important to note that nothing in state or federal law precludes a school board from voting to allow school staff with a valid permit to carry a gun on school premises. The main impediment is the availability of affordable property/casualty insurance to cover those boards who make that decision.  

A Senate amendment removed the school security personnel grant program that would have provided a matching grant for districts employing an SRO or private security.  

IASB is registered undecided on the bill. Although the bill does not change the current procedure that allows a school board to vote to allow armed staff, we would prefer clear language that authorizes a school board to vote to arm staff in the manner outlined in the bill. The bill passed the Senate by a vote of 30-14. The bill was sent back to the House for concurrence on the amendment. 

HF 2602—Grooming as a Criminal Offense: The bill adds grooming of a minor as a criminal offense and defines what constitutes grooming. There are several bills this session addressing grooming and providing definitions, but this bill adds it as a class D felony in addition to a mandatory reporting topic as in the other bills. 

IASB is registered undecided because we want to ensure this definition matches what is added on grooming with respect to mandatory reporting. The bill passed the House by a vote of 94-0 and passed the Senate Judiciary Committee. 

HF 2615—Providing College Debt Information: This bill requires schools to provide 11th and 12th grade students who have expressed an interest in postsecondary education with information compiled by colleges and universities on student loan debt and income of graduates. Additionally, the supplemental weighting for a shared career and college transition counselor or coordinator will be exempt from a district’s maximum allowed weighting. A Senate amendment clarifies that districts only must provide a link to the student debt and income information.    

IASB is registered in support of the bill. We support the operational sharing exemption for the career and college transition counselor role and want to ensure it’s not an extra burden for districts to get the information that must be provided to students on loan debt and income. The bill, as amended, passed the Senate by a vote of 48-0, and the House concurred to pass the bill by a vote of 95-0. It has been sent to Governor Reynolds for her signature. 

HF 2617—Human Growth and Development Curriculum: This bill mandates that the human growth and development curriculum includes information on pregnancy and fetal development. This instruction will start no earlier than 7th grade. The Senate Education Committee amended the bill to remove a requirement that the Meet Baby Olivia video, or something similar, be shown. 

IASB is registered against the bill, as we are on any bill that mandates specific curriculum in code. We think the process of the legislature establishing broad requirements, the State Board of Education adopting educational standards and local districts adopting a curriculum to meet those standards should be followed. The bill passed the House by a vote of 59-35. The bill, as amended, passed the Senate Education Committee. 

HF 2618—Governor’s Literacy Bill: The House adopted a strike after amendment, so the bill contains two main sections: 

  • Foundations of Reading assessment for teacher prep candidates: Teacher prep programs will be required to administer the Foundations of Reading assessment and report the percentage of students above, at or below a passing score to the Department of Education. Students and current teachers will not be required to pass the test for licensure. 

  • Ensuring students are proficient in reading: School districts will provide written notice to parents of a student in grades K-6 who is not grade-level proficient in reading. Parents will have the option to retain their student in the same grade in the next school year. School districts must provide a personalized reading plan for students in grades K-6 who are not reading proficiently until they reach proficiency, through sixth grade if needed.  

IASB is registered in support of this bill because we want to improve reading proficiency in young readers. We hope we can continue to do more to ensure all students are proficient in reading by the end of third grade. The bill, as amended, passed the House by a vote of 92-3.  

HF 2631/SF 2189 —Therapeutic Classroom Funding: This bill allows any leftover money in the Therapeutic Classroom Transportation Reimbursement Claims fund to be transferred and used for the Therapeutic Classroom Incentive Fund.   

IASB is registered for the bill because the funding is still being used to support therapeutic classrooms. The bill passed the House by a vote of 98-0 and Senate Education Committee, respectively.  

HF 2643—Advanced Dyslexia Specialist Endorsement Grant: This bill establishes a competitive grant program for teachers to receive an advanced dyslexia specialist endorsement. It would fund as many as 25 grants for teachers.    

IASB is registered for the bill because it provides specialized training to teachers on the best strategies to help students with dyslexia become proficient readers. The bill passed the House Appropriations Committee. 

HF 2652—School Security and Safety: This bill is the House’s comprehensive school security and safety proposal. The bill includes sections to address several issues related to school security:  

  • Mobile Panic Alert Systems: Districts can purchase and use a system that coordinates with law enforcement and integrates with local public safety infrastructure to transmit 911 calls.  

  • School buildings must comply with building codes before issuing bonds for athletic facilities. The building codes will increase required school safety measures for new infrastructure.   

  • Each district will be required to do a school safety review, if they have not already.   

  • Each attendance center will be required to have at least one handheld radio that can access first responders.  

  • Firearm Detection Software Pilot Program: Three school districts will receive a grant to purchase software that can detect and alert school employees to a gun on school property. Those districts will evaluate the effectiveness of the software.  

  • School Safety and Security Infrastructure Standards Task Force: The Departments of Public Safety, Education, and Homeland Security and Emergency Management will convene a task force with the goal of making recommendations on security standards for schools on things like doors, windows, cameras, and locks. Their recommendations will be used to modify the state building code that will apply to new school construction.   

  • Grants for Infrastructure, Equipment and Training for School Security Personnel: This section, which provides grants to school districts to train and arm staff, was amended on the House floor to establish a grant program in the Department of Homeland Security and Emergency Management with new money appropriated to it, rather than money from the 911 Emergency Communications Fund, as the previous version of the bill did. 

IASB is registered undecided on the bill. We are supportive of many parts of this bill to help school districts ensure their buildings are safe and secure; however, the funding to arm school staff is problematic and could be used for better purposes. The bill, as amended, passed the House by a vote of 59-35.

SF 2185/HF 2150—Transitional Coaching Authorization: This bill removes the requirement for a professional responsibilities and ethics course for a transitional coaching authorization. An amendment requires CPR training within 90 days of receiving this type of authorization.   

IASB is registered for the bill because the course is still required to obtain a full coaching authorization. The bill passed the Senate Education Committee as amended and was placed on the unfinished business calendar.  

SF 2195—Reading Instruction: This bill requires reading instruction to align with principles consistent with the Science of Reading. It also prohibits certain strategies designed to teach students to read using context, specifically the three-cueing system. An amendment clarifies that rote memorization, rather than memory as in the original bill, is a prohibited strategy for reading instruction.   

IASB is registered undecided on the bill because many districts are already implementing instruction informed by the Science of Reading; however, it isn’t the only strategy for reading instruction and teachers should be able to choose what works best for each student. The bill passed the Senate Education Committee as amended and has been placed on the unfinished business calendar

SF 2196—School Immunization Exemptions: This bill would require school districts to include information on exemptions for vaccines on their website and in information that is sent to parents or guardians regarding vaccines.   

IASB is registered undecided on the bill because we want to ensure this isn’t a large burden on school districts. The bill passed the Senate by a vote of 31-15 and passed the House Education Committee. 

SF 2258—Setting Supplemental State Aid (SSA): This bill allows the legislature to set SSA during the 2024 legislative session instead of requiring it within 30 days of the governor’s budget proposal—which would’ve been Feb. 8.  

IASB is registered against the bill because any delay in setting SSA makes it harder for districts to set their budget and required deadlines. The bill passed the Senate Education Committee and was placed on the unfinished business calendar.  

SF 2331—Public Notice RequirementsThe bill requires a public notice website to be operated by a statewide association of newspapers. The website must contain all public notices required by law, be searchable, allow for the public to subscribe to email notifications for certain notices and provide access to the notifications for at least one year after publication. An amendment by the House allows the public notice website to charge a fee to subscribe to the notifications. The fee will not exceed the cost of providing the subscription service.   

Additionally, if a newspaper has a website, they are required to post public notices online without requiring a subscription to see them. Newspaper websites will also publish the link to the statewide website of all public notices.   

IASB is registered in support of the bill, although we preferred an earlier version of the bill that allowed public notice requirements to be met simply by publishing them on the statewide website. The bill passed the House by a vote of 95-2 and the Senate concurred with their amendment and passed it by a vote of 47-0. It has been sent to Governor Reynolds for her signature. 

SF 2365—BOEE Process for Investigating Complaints: This bill moves the process established for investigating complaints against school employees under the authority of the Board of Educational Examiners (BOEE). This process was established in legislation (HF 430) last year, but under the authority of the Department of Education.    

IASB is registered undecided on the bill, but we have no issue with this technical change. The bill passed the Senate Education Committee and has been added to the unfinished business calendar.  

SF 2368/HF 2543—Open Enrollment Funding and Charter Schools: This bill, proposed by the governor, has four divisions.  

Division I says that certain categorical funds will follow open-enrolled students to the receiving district and charter school students to their new school.   

Division II allows for a first right of refusal for charter schools for vacant or underutilized property being sold by a school district. This means the district must give a charter school the first opportunity to purchase it. School districts would be required to publish information on their website about their buildings' size and usage. It also establishes definitions of “underutilized” and “vacant” properties.  

Division III allows the school start date to be the first Tuesday after the end of the Iowa State Fair.   

Division IV removes the requirement that charter school board members be residents of Iowa.  

IASB is registered undecided but has concerns about categorical funds following students because the per pupil amounts of these funds vary across districts, which creates winners and losers. We don’t like Division II and would prefer fair competition when a district decides to sell or lease their property. The bill passed the Senate Education Committee and has been placed on the unfinished business calendar.  

SF 2378—Board of Educational Examiners (BOEE) Investigations: This bill removes the statute of limitations to file a complaint against a school employee for engaging in an inappropriate relationship with a student. An amendment adds language from two other bills to also allow the BOEE to make a criminal referral to law enforcement and mandatory reporting of grooming behavior and other inappropriate relationships to the BOEE.  

IASB is registered for the bill because it aligns the BOEE with other licensing boards in being able to refer criminal cases. Additionally, we like the definitions of grooming behavior and inappropriate relationships that are added. The bill passed the Senate Education Committee as amended and has been placed on the unfinished business calendar.  

SF 2385—Boards and Commissions: This bill is a continuation of the governor’s government reorganization plan from last year. It details which boards and commissions will remain, what will be combined and what will be eliminated. It eliminates the Telecommunications Advisory Committee, which makes recommendations on the use of telecommunications as an instructional tool.   

IASB is registered undecided on the bill. It passed the Senate State Government Committee and has been placed on the unfinished business calendar.  

SF 2386—Governor's AEA Proposal: This bill is starting from the governor’s proposal on AEAs, but the Senate Education Committee approved a strike after amendment, which means they came up with a completely new proposal.   

- Special Education: By Feb. 1 of the preceding school year, districts must notify the AEA of their intent to receive services for the upcoming school year. Districts can choose whether they want to receive their services from the AEA, and if they do, it will be a fee for service model.   

- Professional Development: It may be provided by the AEA to school districts if the director of the Department of Education approves.   

The bill has a two-year phase in for how the funding for services will flow.  

- For the year beginning July 1, 2024, the following funding will still “flow-through” to the AEA:  

  • The full amount for special education services  

  • 40% of media services funding  

  • 40% of educational services funding  

  • The AEA teacher salary supplement and professional development supplement  

- For years beginning July 1, 2025, the following funding will still “flow-through” to the AEA:  

  • 10% of special education services funding  

  • 40% of media services funding  

  • 40% of educational services funding  

  • The AEA teacher salary supplement and professional development supplement  

The remaining funding will go directly to school districts to use to contract for services from the AEA or somewhere else.   

The Senate proposal still includes a division to raise the minimum teacher salary to $46,251  

Even after the amendment, IASB is still registered opposed to the bill. The fee-for-service model for special education is too risky, especially for smaller and more rural districts. It will be hard to find the professionals necessary to provide services and it will become more expensive as there is more competition for those professionals. The bill, as amended, passed the Senate Education Committee and has been placed on the unfinished business calendar.  

SF 2391—Purchasing Meat Products: The bill includes a section that requires school districts to have a policy that prevents them from purchasing food products that are misbranded as meat or egg products or cultivated protein food products. 

IASB is registered undecided on the bill because cultivated-protein food products are not available on the general market, so this shouldn’t impact districts’ current buying practices; however, we do have concerns about which specific products districts will be prevented from buying. The bill passed the House by a vote of 60-34 and passed the Senate by a vote of 33-12. It will now be sent to Governor Reynolds for her signature. 

 

 

Signed by the Governor 

HF 2152—Teacher Leadership and Compensation (TLC) Commission Reports: This bill is a code clean-up bill because of legislation passed last session. It removes the requirement for a report on the TLC program that was removed in last year’s ESA bill, which gave added flexibility to the TLC program.   

IASB is registered undecided on the bill, but we have no concerns with making conforming code changes. The bill passed the House by a vote of 95-0 and the Senate by a vote of 48-0. Governor Reynolds signed the bill into law on April 10, 2024. 

SF 2331—Public Notice Requirements: The bill requires a public notice website to be operated by a statewide association of newspapers. The website must contain all public notices required by law, be searchable, allow for the public to subscribe to email notifications for certain notices and provide access to the notifications for at least one year after publication. An amendment by the House allows the public notice website to charge a fee to subscribe to the notifications. The fee will not exceed the cost of providing the subscription service.    

Additionally, if a newspaper has a website, they are required to post public notices online without requiring a subscription to see them. Newspaper websites will also publish the link to the statewide website of all public notices.    

IASB is registered in support of the bill, although we preferred an earlier version of the bill that allowed public notice requirements to be met simply by publishing them on the statewide website. The bill passed the House by a vote of 95-2 and the Senate concurred with their amendment and passed it by a vote of 47-0. Governor Reynolds signed the bill into law on April 10, 2024. 

HF 2393—Dental Screenings: This bill adds dental screenings, in addition to vision and hearing, as allowed in schools without receiving parental consent. An amendment on the House floor specifically added the word 'screening' to clarify the intent.    

IASB is registered for the bill, as this is an important service schools provide students. The bill passed the House by a vote of 95-0 and passed the Senate 48-0. Governor Reynolds signed the bill into law on April 10, 2024. 

HF 2612—AEAs, Teacher Salaries, and SSA: This bill, having been amended and passed from House to Senate several times, has finally been agreed to and signed by the governor. The final bill includes three components: AEA reform, new minimum teacher salary requirements, and supplemental state aid (SSA). 

IASB has several resources to help you understand the impacts of this bill: 

IASB is registered undecided on the bill because we have concerns about what its implementation will mean for future services provided by the AEAs, specifically in professional development, education and media services. We appreciate that the bill guarantees special education services from the AEAs. Additionally, we’re supportive of providing funding to increase teacher salaries. The bill was passed by the House by a vote of 51-43, passed by the Senate 30-18, and signed by Governor Reynolds on March 27, 2024. 

HF 2653—Perry School District Waivers: This bill provides waivers for hours and graduation requirements for the Perry School District because of the tragic shooting earlier this year. Also, the district can use its management fund to pay a one-time retention bonus to employees. The state Department of Education will work with the U.S. Department of Education to ensure other waivers are granted for federal requirements.   

IASB is registered in support of the bill because it helps Perry get through a difficult school year without worrying about these requirements. The bill passed the House by a vote of 94-1 and passed the Senate by a vote of 49-0. Governor Reynolds signed the bill on April 5, 2024.


 

Bills That Died

HF 2546—Social Media Instruction

HF 2154—Student Report Cards

HF 2609—Student Liaisons on School Boards 

HF 2486—Continuing Education Requirements 

HF 2548—World Language Instruction 

HF 2547—Addressing Chronic Absenteeism 

HF 2544—Mandating Social Studies Curriculum 

SF 2332—Computer Science Graduation Requirement 

SF 2383—Increased Preschool Funding 

SF 2388—Administrator Severance Payments 

SF 2333—Sale of Property to Nonpublic Schools 

SF 2374—Union Recertification Elections 

SF 2333—Sale of Property to Nonpublic Schools 

HF 2457—Mandating Holocaust Curriculum 

HF 2396—Prohibited Discipline for Incorrect Pronoun Usage 

SF 2105—Adding Pupils for Shared Operational Funding 

HSB 585—School Start Date 

HF 2261—BOEE Investigations 

HF 2270—Criminal Referrals from BOEE 

SF 2191—Fire Alarm Policy and Procedures  

SF 2190—SAVE Enrollment Calculations 

SF 2192—Adopting a Core Curriculum 

SF 2206—Charter School Student Extracurricular Participation 

HF 2150—Transitional Coaching Authorization 

HF 2151—BOEE Process for Investigating Complaints 

HSB 571—Adopting a Core Curriculum 

 


Envise Logo with tag

Privacy Policy | Terms of Use

14.2.2024.2